Tag Archives: synonyms

Lookalikes: Elicit vs. Illicit


Today, I’m giving you another set of confused word.

Elicit [ih-lis-it] (verb):

to draw or bring out forth; evoke

Example:

Our words and actions should elicit  positive changes in our society.

Illicit [ih-lis-it] (adj.):

not legally permitted or authorized. (think illegal)

Example:

I refused in participate in any illicit activity.

 

Word of the Day: Guile


appearances-are-deceptive-oleksiy-maksymenko

Hello everyone! I hope your week is going well so far. Today, I’m sharing with you my new favorite word.

Guile [gahyl] (noun):

insidious cunning in attaining a goal; artful or crafty deception; duplicity.

Example:

She lured him in, her smile paralyzing his logic. His vanity blocked the thought of her approach being a mere part of her guile .

 

Word of the Day: Smelly Words


Young Girl (13-14) Holding Her Nose at the Dinner TableLet’s explore some words that would make you wince.

Noisome [noi-suhm] (adj.):

1. harmful or disgusting, as an odor.

2. harmful or injurious to health.

Example:
Can you turn off that cigar? The smell is noisome.

Pungent [puhn-juhnt] (adj.):

1. sharply affecting the organs of taste or smell, as if by a penetrating power; biting; acrid.

2. acutely distressing to the feelings or mind; poignant.

3. caustic, biting, or sharply expressive: pungent remarks.

4. mentally stimulating or appealing: wit.

5. Biology . piercing or sharp-pointed.
Example:
Not even the best perfume could mask that pungent smell of his.

Misunderstood: Contented Vs. Contentious


Opposites_attract_by_stella_marina

No, Contentious is not derived from content. It’s not its adjective. It’s not another noun with the same meaning. It’s a totally different word that has a totally different meaning.

Content [kuhn-tent] or Contented [kuhn-ten-tid] (adj.):

satisfied, contempt, agreeing.

Example:

You can’t bribe me with your money, I’m contented with my own.

Contentious [kuhn-ten-shuhs] (adj.):

1. argumentative, quarrelsome.

2. causing argument or strife.

Example:

When the issue became contentious, the negotiation had to be halted until both parties regained their composure.

Twins: Wrath and Wroth


ImageYou know that Wrath, the deadly sin, means anger. Did you know, however, that wrath has a twin brother? I didn’t, until recently. Meet¬†Wroth.

Wroth [rawth, roth or, esp. British, rohth] (adj.):

1. angry.

2. stormy, violent, turbulent.

Example:

His wroth blurred his common sense. At that moment, he was ready to do anything.