Tag Archives: education

Word of the Day: Miscreant


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Miscreant [mis-kree-uhnt] (noun):

Villain, depraved person.

(adj.):

Villainous,evil, base behavior.

Example:

The miscreant handed her the bloodred, poisonous apple. “Take a bite,” she said, smiling wickedly.

Misunderstood: Contented Vs. Contentious


Opposites_attract_by_stella_marina

No, Contentious is not derived from content. It’s not its adjective. It’s not another noun with the same meaning. It’s a totally different word that has a totally different meaning.

Content [kuhn-tent] or Contented [kuhn-ten-tid] (adj.):

satisfied, contempt, agreeing.

Example:

You can’t bribe me with your money, I’m contented with my own.

Contentious [kuhn-ten-shuhs] (adj.):

1. argumentative, quarrelsome.

2. causing argument or strife.

Example:

When the issue became contentious, the negotiation had to be halted until both parties regained their composure.

Twins: Wrath and Wroth


ImageYou know that Wrath, the deadly sin, means anger. Did you know, however, that wrath has a twin brother? I didn’t, until recently. Meet Wroth.

Wroth [rawth, roth or, esp. British, rohth] (adj.):

1. angry.

2. stormy, violent, turbulent.

Example:

His wroth blurred his common sense. At that moment, he was ready to do anything.

Lookalikes III: Emerge Vs. Immerge


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This is another set of words I commonly confuse. Turns out, they are not only pronounced alike but they are, more or less, antonyms.

Emerge [ih-murj] (verb):

1. to come forth into view or notice.

2. to rise, as from difficulty.

3. to come into existence.

Example:

Little bubbles emerged on the surface of the water. “Someone’s down there,” he yelled, “and he’s breathing.”

Immerge [ih-murj] (verb):

1. to plunge, as into fluid.

2. to disappear by entering into a medium, as the moon into the shadow of the sun.

(Think Immerse)

Example:

Having arrived at a dead end, Sergey caught his breath and immerged himself under the surface of the pond.

Word of the Day — Calorifacient


Wonder-50-Chili-Pepper-Static-ImageYes, calorie is the unit of measurement of energy in our food. I bet you didn’t know there was an adjective for that!

Calorifacient [kuh-lawr-uh-fey-shuhnt] (adj.):

(of foods) producing heat.

Example:

The intensity of the calorifacient chili pepper was evident on Sara’s sweaty forehead.

Lookalikes — Imminent VS. Eminent


ImageAnother set of vocabulary lookalikes is coming your way.

Imminent [im-uh-nuh nt] (adj.):

1. likely to occur at any moment; impending.

2. projecting or leaning forward; overhanging.

Example:

Robert looked at the shattered glass in the laboratory, surrounded by bio hazard symbols, and knew, right away, that a catastrophe was imminent.

Eminent [em-uh-nuh nt] (adj.):

1. noteworthy, prominent.

2. high in station or rank.

Example:

The leader of the organization gave an eminent speech about the dangers of overpopulation.

Lookalikes — Desperate Vs. Disparate


ImageToday, I bring you another set of doppelgangers.

Desperate Vs. Disparate

Desperate [des-per-it, -prit] (adj.):

1. Having an urgent need, desire.

2. Reckless, dangerous because of despair.

Example:

She was so desperate for his attention, she jumped in the pool with her clothes on just so he could glance one more time at her before he walked out of that door.

Disparate [dis-per-it, dih-spar-](adj.):

Distinct, dissimilar, essentially different.

Example:

Their personalities were so disparate, that everyone understood their attraction but nobody could comprehend how they managed to live under one roof.

Vocabulary Lookalikes — Appraise Vs. Apprise


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The English language has several similarly spelled words which are distant in meaning. Don’t we all get our words confused sometimes? Today’s words are doppelgangers. For the sake of not confusing those two words together, here are their meanings and proper usage.

Appraise Vs. Apprise

Appraise [uh-preyz] (verb):

estimate or determine the worth, importance, or quality of something.

Example:

After she appraised the situation, she decided that the best thing to do was to walk away and never look back.

Apprise [uh-prahyz] (verb):

to give advice; to inform, advise.

Example:

I asked his sister to apprise me of what to get him on Valentine’s Day.

Book Review — Where Angels Fear to Tread by E. M. Forster (1905)


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E. M. Forster’s book is not recommended for those who are looking for suspense. In spite of the ominous title of the book, the plot actually isn’t as dark.

Where Angels Fear to Tread discusses social differences and their effect on people’s characters and relationships. It shows how people who are forced to behave in certain manners seldom do, and that leads to undesired consequences.

What I liked about the book: the weaved web of social and interpersonal events which gave the plot a certain amount of depth.

What I disliked about the book: the showing instead of telling; and the jumping from one era to another sometimes within the same line.

I just discovered that this book was made into a movie. Did anyone watch it? What do you think of the movie version of the book?

Word of the Day — Mendacity


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Have you told any lies today? Remember: “if you tell the truth, you don’t have to remember anything.”

Mendacity [men-das-i-tee] (noun):

1. Untruthfulness, tendency to lie.

2. An instance of lying, falsehood.

Example:

She knew she couldn’t believe someone who had mendacity flowing in his bloodstream. She simply smiled and walked away.

Share an example of the way you would use today’s word.