All posts by Miss Benison

Ukrainian by birth, Lebanese by force, daydreaming dweller, relentless writer, eloquent speaker of five languages, avid reader, annoying perfectionist, art and beauty enthusiast, certified risk taker, aspiring world-traveler, collector of bobby pins and precious moments. I tend to bite off more than I can chew. Follow my journey of digesting life.

Book Review: And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie


and-then-there-were-none4 Stars

Ten people trapped on an Indian island, each with a past darker than the other. One by one they start dying. They suspect each other – there’s no one else on the island but them. Facing their inner demons, they are murdered, one by one, till there are none.

The suspense in Agatha’s story is unbearable. I heard many say that this is one of her best books. I would have to read more of her work to make such a statement. This book, however, is a thrill. The anticipation of discovering whose death would be next, how the next victim would die, who will stay till the end, and, most importantly, who’s the killer, is nerve wrecking.

The revelation at the end is not something I expected – I can’t really say if that’s a good thing or not. All in all, however, And Then There Were None (also known as Ten Little Indians) is a very good book to pick up and read on a cold winter night.

Word of the Day: Miscreant


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Miscreant [mis-kree-uhnt] (noun):

Villain, depraved person.

(adj.):

Villainous,evil, base behavior.

Example:

The miscreant handed her the bloodred, poisonous apple. “Take a bite,” she said, smiling wickedly.

Misunderstood: Contented Vs. Contentious


Opposites_attract_by_stella_marina

No, Contentious is not derived from content. It’s not its adjective. It’s not another noun with the same meaning. It’s a totally different word that has a totally different meaning.

Content [kuhn-tent] or Contented [kuhn-ten-tid] (adj.):

satisfied, contempt, agreeing.

Example:

You can’t bribe me with your money, I’m contented with my own.

Contentious [kuhn-ten-shuhs] (adj.):

1. argumentative, quarrelsome.

2. causing argument or strife.

Example:

When the issue became contentious, the negotiation had to be halted until both parties regained their composure.

Twins: Wrath and Wroth


ImageYou know that Wrath, the deadly sin, means anger. Did you know, however, that wrath has a twin brother? I didn’t, until recently. Meet Wroth.

Wroth [rawth, roth or, esp. British, rohth] (adj.):

1. angry.

2. stormy, violent, turbulent.

Example:

His wroth blurred his common sense. At that moment, he was ready to do anything.

Lookalikes III: Emerge Vs. Immerge


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This is another set of words I commonly confuse. Turns out, they are not only pronounced alike but they are, more or less, antonyms.

Emerge [ih-murj] (verb):

1. to come forth into view or notice.

2. to rise, as from difficulty.

3. to come into existence.

Example:

Little bubbles emerged on the surface of the water. “Someone’s down there,” he yelled, “and he’s breathing.”

Immerge [ih-murj] (verb):

1. to plunge, as into fluid.

2. to disappear by entering into a medium, as the moon into the shadow of the sun.

(Think Immerse)

Example:

Having arrived at a dead end, Sergey caught his breath and immerged himself under the surface of the pond.

Word of the Day — Calorifacient


Wonder-50-Chili-Pepper-Static-ImageYes, calorie is the unit of measurement of energy in our food. I bet you didn’t know there was an adjective for that!

Calorifacient [kuh-lawr-uh-fey-shuhnt] (adj.):

(of foods) producing heat.

Example:

The intensity of the calorifacient chili pepper was evident on Sara’s sweaty forehead.

Lookalikes — Imminent VS. Eminent


ImageAnother set of vocabulary lookalikes is coming your way.

Imminent [im-uh-nuh nt] (adj.):

1. likely to occur at any moment; impending.

2. projecting or leaning forward; overhanging.

Example:

Robert looked at the shattered glass in the laboratory, surrounded by bio hazard symbols, and knew, right away, that a catastrophe was imminent.

Eminent [em-uh-nuh nt] (adj.):

1. noteworthy, prominent.

2. high in station or rank.

Example:

The leader of the organization gave an eminent speech about the dangers of overpopulation.

Lookalikes — Desperate Vs. Disparate


ImageToday, I bring you another set of doppelgangers.

Desperate Vs. Disparate

Desperate [des-per-it, -prit] (adj.):

1. Having an urgent need, desire.

2. Reckless, dangerous because of despair.

Example:

She was so desperate for his attention, she jumped in the pool with her clothes on just so he could glance one more time at her before he walked out of that door.

Disparate [dis-per-it, dih-spar-](adj.):

Distinct, dissimilar, essentially different.

Example:

Their personalities were so disparate, that everyone understood their attraction but nobody could comprehend how they managed to live under one roof.